these, our bodies, possessed by light

tell me we'll never get used to it.

Jul 25
un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

Rumba Abierta (1960)

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

Rumba Abierta (1960)


Jul 23

(via fourlisabeth)


un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

variation of an old gif…

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

variation of an old gif…

(via sashayed)




archiemcphee:

We’ve seen a marble sweatsuit and marble sculptures that appear to be made of crumbly styrofoam, now please marvel along with us at these lovely lightweight, airy dresses on hangers waiting to be worn. Only they won’t be worn by anyone because they’ve been painstakingly carved from Carrera Marble by Edinburgh, Scotland-based sculptor Alasdair Thomson for a series entitled The Identity Collection. Each piece is based on a garment donated to Thomson by a friend or family member.

Visit Alasdair’s website and Instagram account to check out more of his awesome sculptures.

[via Colossal and Beautiful/Decay]

(via sashayed)


Jul 22

erospainter:

UK-based artist Robin Wight uses stainless steel wire to form stunning, dramatic sculptures of winged fairies dancing in the wind. The enchanting forms, which range in size from miniature to life-sized, seem to have a life of their own as they strike dynamic poses, contort their bodies, and hold onto windswept dandelions.

To construct his ethereal sculptures, Wight first builds a sturdy skeleton out of thick steel wire. He then uses different gauges of wire to create muscles, limbs, and skin, wrapping them around the skeleton until they form a dense, lifelike form. Inside each figure lies a heart of stone, sometimes engraved with messages to make each piece unique and personalized.

The Staffordshire resident, who only started constructing fairy sculptures a few years ago as a simple hobby, was inspired by a photo he took in the woods one day. In the image, a hazy shimmer partially obscures a tree branch, revealing a mysterious, fairy-like shape. Whether the enigmatic form was a trick of the light or an otherworldly sign, Wight’s imagination has been captured by fairies ever since, resulting in his magical sculptures.

Many of Wight’s pieces are on display at the Trentham Gardens or in the homes of private clients. Although the sculptor is currently not accepting commissions due to a flood of interest, he has DIY starter kits as well as detailed instructions on his website, for anyone who wants to recreate some of the magic on their own.

(via 1demise)


Jul 20
wehadfacesthen:

Newlyweds Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, 1940s

wehadfacesthen:

Newlyweds Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, 1940s

(via sashayed)


mudwerks:

Michael Dumontier

mudwerks:

Michael Dumontier

(via sashayed)


misswallflower:

“The Muse” by Gabriel de Cool ; 1895 

misswallflower:

“The Muse” by Gabriel de Cool ; 1895 

(via christophus)


Page 1 of 535